Engineering

American Water Resources Association Honors Geoff Schladow

DAVIS, Calif.; October 10, 2016–Geoff Schladow, professor in the UC Davis Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, has been selected as the recipient of the American Water Resources Association 2016 David R. Maidment Award for outstanding contributions to Water Resources Data and Information Systems. He received the award on July 13, 2016 at an American Water Resources Association conference.

Geoff Schladow is a professor in the UC Davis Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. He also directs the Tahoe Environmental Research Center.

Geoff Schladow is a professor in the UC Davis Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. He also directs the UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center.

Schladow is an expert on both field data collection and numerical modeling, and frequently brings together teams of researchers to work on large, interdisciplinary projects. He is the founding director of the UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center.

Schladow says that it’s an honor for the American Water Resources Association to recognize his research. He says that when working in fluid environments you must understand and record spatial information, but also capture time varying information.

“These temporal changes occur at time scales ranging from a fraction of a second to many decades,” Schladow says. “Technological advances are making it easier to collect data, but interpreting it, visualizing it and learning from it is where challenges still exist and where I find myself working”

Schladow’s research focuses on the interaction between fluid transport and mixing processes with water quality in natural and engineered systems. Examples of such systems include lakes, rivers, estuaries and mining pits. Using a combination of field experimentation, detailed laboratory studies and numerical modeling, he is better quantifying the critical flux paths in these systems. The results of this work will lead to improved methods of managing and controlling our water resources.

Schladow received his Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of Western Australia and a master’s in hydraulic engineering from UC Berkeley.